U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama forgoes headscarf in Saudi Arabia

Written by admin on 24/07/2019 Categories: 广州桑拿网

WATCH ABOVE:  U.S. President Barack Obama cancels a visit to the Taj Mahal to make an unscheduled trip to Saudi Arabia. 

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia – For first lady Michelle Obama, just a few hours in Saudi Arabia were enough to illustrate the stark limitations under which Saudi women live.

Joining President Barack Obama for a condolence visit after the death of the King Abdullah, Mrs. Obama stepped off of Air Force One wearing long pants and a long, brightly coloured jacket — but no headscarf.

As the new Saudi King, Salman bin Abdul Aziz waits at the bottom of the stairs, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama disembark from Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. The president and first lady have come to expresses their condolences on the death of the late Saudi Arabian King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

In this Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015 photo provided by the Saudi Press Agency, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand in a receiving line, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. The president came to expresses condolences on the death of the late Saudi Arabian King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud.

AP Photo/SPA

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015, after meeting with the new Saudi King, Salman bin Abdul Aziz to expresses condolences on the death of the late Saudi Arabian King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud. The president and first lady are en route to Washington by way of Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand with Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz in a receiving line on arrival to King Khalid International Airport, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. The president came to expresses condolences on the death of the late Saudi Arabian King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Under the kingdom’s strict dress code for women, Saudi females are required to wear a headscarf and loose, black robes in public. Most women in Saudi Arabia cover their hair and face with a veil known as the niqab.

But covering one’s head is not required for foreigners, and some Western women choose to forego the headscarf while in Saudi Arabia.

WATCH: White House spokesman Eric Schultz responds to criticism of Michelle Obama for not wearing a headscarf in Saudi Arabia.

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  • World leaders head to Saudi Arabia to pay respects to late King Abdullah

    As a delegation of dozens of Saudi officials — all men — greeted the Obamas in Riyadh, some shook hands with Mrs. Obama. Others avoided a handshake but acknowledged the first lady with a nod as they passed by.

    According to the Washington Post, More than 1,500 tweets using the hashtag #ميشيل_أوباما_سفور (roughly, #Michelle_Obama_unveiled) were sent Tuesday, many of which criticized her.

    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand with new Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz they arrive on Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.

    AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

    Saudi Arabia imposes many restrictions on women on the strict interpretation of Islamic Shariah law known as Wahhabism. Genders are strictly segregated. Women are banned from driving, although there have been campaigns in recent years to lift that ban. Guardianship laws also require women to get permission from a male relative to travel, get married, enrol in higher education or undergo certain surgical procedures.

    FILE – In this Tuesday, March 3, 2009, file photo, Saudi women visit the 4th Riyadh International Book Fair in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Single Saudi women stand at the center of a societal pivot. On the one hand, the kingdom has increasingly encouraged women to graduate from college and enter the workforce. On the other hand, it still requires that they adhere to laws that give men final say over their lives. Over the past three decades until around 2009, the number of Saudi women working was less than 50,000, but is now more than 400,000, according to the Labor Ministry.

    AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File

    FILE – In this Aug. 3, 2008 file photo, a Saudi woman checks a wedding dress at a shop in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Under Saudi Arabia’s Wahhabi interpretation of Islam, the sexes are strictly segregated, making it harder for young people to meet. Morality police keep women and men apart in restaurants, malls and public spaces, and schools and most universities are segregated. The increase in single women has alarmed the country’s clerics, who have responded by pushing for early marriage and preaching on the evil consequences of “spinsterhood,” such as sex outside wedlock.

    AP Photo, File

    FILE – In this file photo taken Saturday, March 29, 2014, Aziza Yousef drives a car in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia’s ban on women driving. A Saudi official said Friday, Nov. 7, that the kingdom’s advisory council has recommended to the government for the first time the partial lifting of the ban on women driving, but with conditions: Only women over 30, only during the day, and no makeup allowed while driving.

    AP Photo/Hasan Jamali, File

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